Immunology

Date: January 6, 1992, pp.16 S.H.E. Kaufmann, "Heat shock proteins and the immune response," Immunology Today, 11:129-36, 1990. (IMMUNOLOGY) Stefan H.E. Kaufmann (University of Ulm, Germany): "I assume that until recently most of my colleagues working in immunology associated the term `stress' with the feelings one has when an experiment does not work well or when a paper has been rejected. "Cell biologists earlier had found that cells show a stress response that very much resembles our own

The Scientist Staff
Jan 5, 1992


Date: January 6, 1992, pp.16

S.H.E. Kaufmann, "Heat shock proteins and the immune response," Immunology Today, 11:129-36, 1990. (IMMUNOLOGY) Stefan H.E. Kaufmann (University of Ulm, Germany):

"I assume that until recently most of my colleagues working in immunology associated the term `stress' with the feelings one has when an experiment does not work well or when a paper has been rejected.

"Cell biologists earlier had found that cells show a stress response that very much resembles our own: It is ubiquitous and evolutionarily conserved. The cellular stress response is often called heat shock response because elevated temperature is the most widely used experimental insult. The result of the cellular stress response is the expression of a certain set of proteins called `heat shock proteins' (hsp). It is now clear that many hsp perform important functions in the normal cell. In fact, two reviews identified as `Hot Papers' last year deal...

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