Immunology

J.G. Bodmer, S.G.E. Marsh, E. Albert, "Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 1989," Immunology Today, 11, 3-10, January 1990. Julia Bodmer (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London): "`What's in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet.' Shakespeare was right only in pointing out that it does not matter whether we call the flower a rose or a widget. The important thing is that we all call it by the same name. The 1989 nomenclature report is the ninth in a

The Scientist Staff
Mar 17, 1991

J.G. Bodmer, S.G.E. Marsh, E. Albert, "Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 1989," Immunology Today, 11, 3-10, January 1990.

Julia Bodmer (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London): "`What's in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet.' Shakespeare was right only in pointing out that it does not matter whether we call the flower a rose or a widget. The important thing is that we all call it by the same name. The 1989 nomenclature report is the ninth in a series, starting in 1967, that has effectively defined, by consensus, the development of the field of human histocompatibility. Early reports were based on serology, defining alleles and loci and the relationship between them. Later reports named cellularly defined specificities. This 1989 report, to be updated annually, deals solely with the naming of HLA genes and alleles identified by molecular...

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