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Leptin or 'Pubertin'?

For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Philippe Froguel, a professor of genetics and nutrition at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.   K. Clement, C. Vaisse, N. Lahlou, S. Cabrol, V. Pelloux, D. Cassuto, M. Gourmelen, C. Dina, J. Chambaz, J.M. Lacorte, A. Basdevant, P. Bougneres, Y. Lebouc, P. Froguel, B. Guy-Grand, "A mutation in the

Eugene Russo

For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Philippe Froguel, a professor of genetics and nutrition at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

 

K. Clement, C. Vaisse, N. Lahlou, S. Cabrol, V. Pelloux, D. Cassuto, M. Gourmelen, C. Dina, J. Chambaz, J.M. Lacorte, A. Basdevant, P. Bougneres, Y. Lebouc, P. Froguel, B. Guy-Grand, "A mutation in the human leptin receptor gene causes obesity and pituitary dysfunction," Nature, 392:398-401, March 26, 1998. (Cited in more than 200 papers since publication)

In the last several years, leptin has proven to be quite complex. Initially touted as a key to alleviating chronic obesity, leptin is now known to play a more general part in a variety of hormonal processes. "The real name for...

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