Long-Term Potentiation Equals Spinal Growth

For this article, Leslie Pray interviewed Tobias Bonhoeffer, managing director, chairman of the board, and cellular and systems neurobiology department head at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Munchen-Martinsried, Germany. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. F. Engert, T. Bonhoeffer, "Dendritic spine changes associated with hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity,

Leslie Pray
Dec 9, 2001
For this article, Leslie Pray interviewed Tobias Bonhoeffer, managing director, chairman of the board, and cellular and systems neurobiology department head at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Munchen-Martinsried, Germany. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

F. Engert, T. Bonhoeffer, "Dendritic spine changes associated with hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity," Nature, 399:66-70, May 1999. (Cited in 162 papers)



Memory, despite some advances, remains a neurological mystery. While scientists know that people "store memories in the brain either by changing the strength of the synapse or by producing new synapses," says Tobias Bonhoeffer, cellular and systems neurobiology department head at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Munchen-Martinsried, Germany, synapses can weaken over time. With this Hot Paper, Bonhoeffer and co-author Florian Engert showed how...

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