Macrophage Regulation

For this article, Nadia S. Halim interviewed Christopher K. Glass, professor of cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. M. Ricote, A.C. Li, T.M. Willson, C.J. Kelly, and C.K. Glass, "The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g is a negative regulator of macrophage activation," Nature, 391:79-82, Jan.

Nadia Halim
May 28, 2000

For this article, Nadia S. Halim interviewed Christopher K. Glass, professor of cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

M. Ricote, A.C. Li, T.M. Willson, C.J. Kelly, and C.K. Glass, "The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g is a negative regulator of macrophage activation," Nature, 391:79-82, Jan. 1, 1998. (Cited in more than 175 papers since publication)

Macrophages, immune system scavengers, guard against disease by ingesting particulate material, including microbes. While studying how the body regulates these cells, Christopher K. Glass, professor of cellular and molecular medicine, and his lab at the University of California, San Diego, found that activated macrophages express high levels of the PPAR-g receptor. Because this protein belongs to a...

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