Molecular Biology

S. Matsuda, H. Kosako, K. Takenaka, K. Moriyama, H. Sakai, T. Akiyama, Y. Gotoh, E. Nishida, "Xenopus MAP kinase activator: identification and function as a key intermediate in the phosphorylation cascade," The EMBO Journal, 11:973-82, 1992. Eisuke Nishida (Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Japan): "MAP kinases have been described as serine/threonine kinases that are acti

The Scientist Staff
Feb 20, 1994

S. Matsuda, H. Kosako, K. Takenaka, K. Moriyama, H. Sakai, T. Akiyama, Y. Gotoh, E. Nishida, "Xenopus MAP kinase activator: identification and function as a key intermediate in the phosphorylation cascade," The EMBO Journal, 11:973-82, 1992.

Eisuke Nishida (Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Japan): "MAP kinases have been described as serine/threonine kinases that are activated commonly by various growth factors and tumor promoters in mammalian cultured cells. They are now thought to function as key molecules in a variety of signal transduction processes. As MAP kinases are unique in requiring both tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation to become active, it was hypothesized that two kinds of protein kinases, a serine/threonine kinase and a tyrosine kinase, might function as direct upstream activators for MAP kinases. In this paper, however, we revealed that a single 45-kilodalton protein factor from Xenopus-mature oocytes is sufficient for activation of...

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