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Neurochemistry

Edited by: Steve Bunk THERE THEY ARE: Harvard's Wilma Wasco and colleagues found the subcellular locales of the presenilins, in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. D.M. Kovacs, H.J. Fausett, K.J. Page, T.W. Kim, R.D. Moir, D.E. Merriam, R.D. Hollister, O.G. Hallmark, R. Mancini, K.M. Fstein, B.T. Hyman, R.E. Tanzi, W. Wasco, "Alzheimer-associated presenilins 1 and 2: Neuronal expression in brain and localization to intracellular membranes in mammalian cells," Nature Medicine, 2:2

Steve Bunk

Edited by: Steve Bunk


THERE THEY ARE: Harvard's Wilma Wasco and colleagues found the subcellular locales of the presenilins, in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex.
D.M. Kovacs, H.J. Fausett, K.J. Page, T.W. Kim, R.D. Moir, D.E. Merriam, R.D. Hollister, O.G. Hallmark, R. Mancini, K.M. Fstein, B.T. Hyman, R.E. Tanzi, W. Wasco, "Alzheimer-associated presenilins 1 and 2: Neuronal expression in brain and localization to intracellular membranes in mammalian cells," Nature Medicine, 2:224-9, 1996. (Cited in more than 115 publications as of January 1998) Comments by Wilma Wasco, Genetics and Aging Unit and Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital-East, Harvard Medical School

At times, neurochemical research resembles a particularly frustrating detective story, in which each clue creates yet more mystery. Such is the case concerning the principal subject of research in this paper, two novel human genes called the presenilins (PS1 and PS2). Both the normal biological...

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