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New Cells Thrive in Brain's Learning Center

1. T.J. Shors et al., "Neurogenesis in the adult is involved in the formation of trace memories," Nature, 410:372-5, March 2001. For this article, Leslie Pray interviewed Tracey Shors, behavioral neuroscientist and associate professor in the psychology department at Rutgers University. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. E. Gould, A. Beylin, P. Tanapat, A. Reeves, T.J. Shors,

Leslie Pray
1. T.J. Shors et al., "Neurogenesis in the adult is involved in the formation of trace memories," Nature, 410:372-5, March 2001.

For this article, Leslie Pray interviewed Tracey Shors, behavioral neuroscientist and associate professor in the psychology department at Rutgers University. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

E. Gould, A. Beylin, P. Tanapat, A. Reeves, T.J. Shors, "Learning enhances adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal formation," Nature Neuroscience, 2[3]:260-5, March 1999. (Cited in 132 papers)



Courtesy of Tracey Shors

Tracey Shors

For decades, biologists believed that brain cells didn't regenerate. But over the past several years, researchers from a handful of laboratories across the country, including Elizabeth Gould's lab at Princeton University, proved this opinion to be wrong. Indeed, up to 5,000 new cells are...

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