Nuclear Hormone Receptors

For this article, Nadia S. Halim interviewed Ronald Evans, professor in the gene expression laboratory, Salk Institute, La Jolla, Calif., and Hongwu Chen, postdoctoral fellow, Salk Institute. Both are coauthors of this Cell paper. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that this paper has been cited significantly more often than the average paper of the same type and age. H. Chen, R.J. Lin, R.L. Schiltz, D. Chakravarti, A. Nash, L. Nagy, M. L. Privalsky, Y. Nakatani, and R.M. Evan

Nadia Halim
Feb 6, 2000

For this article, Nadia S. Halim interviewed Ronald Evans, professor in the gene expression laboratory, Salk Institute, La Jolla, Calif., and Hongwu Chen, postdoctoral fellow, Salk Institute. Both are coauthors of this Cell paper. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that this paper has been cited significantly more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

H. Chen, R.J. Lin, R.L. Schiltz, D. Chakravarti, A. Nash, L. Nagy, M. L. Privalsky, Y. Nakatani, and R.M. Evans, "Nuclear receptor coactivator ACTR is a novel histone acetyltransferase and forms a multimeric activation complex with P/CAF and CBP/p300," Cell, 90:569-80, Aug. 8, 1997. (Cited in about 300 papers since publication)

By interacting with their nuclear receptors, hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological functions, including metabolism, growth, and cell differentiation. Because disruptions often cause disease, this research area has been developing rapidly. Ronald Evans...

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