Piecing Together Actin Assembly

For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Marc Kirschner, Carl W. Walter professor of cell biology at Harvard Medical School. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. R. Rohatgi, L. Ma, H. Miki, M. Lopez, T. Kirchhausen, T. Takenawa, M.W. Kirschner, "The interaction between N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex links Cdc42-dependent signals to actin assembly," Cell, 97:221-31, April 16, 19

Eugene Russo
Apr 15, 2001
For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Marc Kirschner, Carl W. Walter professor of cell biology at Harvard Medical School. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

R. Rohatgi, L. Ma, H. Miki, M. Lopez, T. Kirchhausen, T. Takenawa, M.W. Kirschner, "The interaction between N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex links Cdc42-dependent signals to actin assembly," Cell, 97:221-31, April 16, 1999. (Cited in 137 papers)


Cells rely on their cytoskeletons to do just about everything--from migration to differentiation. Cell biologists must therefore understand the role of actin, a major cytoskeleton component, in order to comprehend the fundamental mechanisms of cellular responses. By the late 1990s, cell biologists had identified several molecules involved in actin assembly, including Cdc42, Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASP), phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2...

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