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Plant Biology

Date: May 16,1994, pp.16 G.F.J.M Van Den Ackerveken, J.A.L. Van Kan, P.J.G.M. De Wit, "Molecular analysis of the avirulence gene avr9 of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fluvum fully supports the gene-for- gene hypothesis," Plant Journal, 2:359-66, 1992. Pierre J.G.M. De Wit (Department of Phytopathology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, the Netherlands): "Many plant pathologists interested in communication b

The Scientist Staff


Date: May 16,1994, pp.16

G.F.J.M Van Den Ackerveken, J.A.L. Van Kan, P.J.G.M. De Wit, "Molecular analysis of the avirulence gene avr9 of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fluvum fully supports the gene-for- gene hypothesis," Plant Journal, 2:359-66, 1992.

Pierre J.G.M. De Wit (Department of Phytopathology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, the Netherlands): "Many plant pathologists interested in communication between plants and their pathogens were puzzled for many years about the molecular basis of the so-called gene-for-gene hypothesis, put forward by H.H. Flor more than 50 years ago (Phytopathology, 32:653-69, 1942). This hypothesis states that resistance of a plant against a fungal pathogen is based on interaction between a resistance gene of the plant and an avirulence gene of the invading pathogen. Such an interaction generally leads to a hypersensitive response, an active process in plants whereby a few host cells die rapidly around the site of penetration. This local...

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