Plant Biology

E.E. Farmer, C.A. Ryan, "Octadecanoid precursors of a jasmonic acid activate the synthesis of wound-inducible proteinase inhibitors," Plant Cell, 4:129-34, 1992. Clarence A. Ryan (Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman): "The understanding of signaling pathways that regulate genes in response to environmental and developmental signals is a central theme in plant biology. How plants regulate genes in

The Scientist Staff
Jan 9, 1994

E.E. Farmer, C.A. Ryan, "Octadecanoid precursors of a jasmonic acid activate the synthesis of wound-inducible proteinase inhibitors," Plant Cell, 4:129-34, 1992.

Clarence A. Ryan (Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman): "The understanding of signaling pathways that regulate genes in response to environmental and developmental signals is a central theme in plant biology. How plants regulate genes in response to insect and pathogen attacks is important to the understanding of both intercellular and intracellular signaling circuits that are fundamental to the plant's survival, as well as in applying this knowledge to improve crop productivity. Recent research in our laboratory has revealed that an 18-amino-acid polypeptide called systemin as well as a small cyclopentanone called jasmonic acid and its methyl ester, methyl jasmonate, are powerful inducers of the synthesis of two serine proteinase inhibitor proteins, called inhibitor I and inhibitor II, that are synthesized as defense proteins in response to...

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