Programmed Cell Death

'NO GENE IS AN ISLAND': A paper coauthored by MIT's Robert Horvitz describes genetic similarities between mammals and worms. This paper is one of the many to have been published in the last few years that have added to the growing understanding of what factors control cell death. "We have for some years been attempting to understand the mechanisms that control programmed cell death by studying the genetics of cell death in the nematode C. elegans," says H. Robert Horvitz, an investigator with

Karen Young Kreeger
Feb 4, 1996
Robert Horvitz 'NO GENE IS AN ISLAND': A paper coauthored by MIT's Robert Horvitz describes genetic similarities between mammals and worms.
This paper is one of the many to have been published in the last few years that have added to the growing understanding of what factors control cell death. "We have for some years been attempting to understand the mechanisms that control programmed cell death by studying the genetics of cell death in the nematode C. elegans," says H. Robert Horvitz, an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "We have identified a pathway of genes that function in this process. At the beginning of this pathway is the gene ced-9, which we showed a few years ago to be a negative regulator of cell death [M.O. Hengartner et al., Nature, 356:494-9, 1992]. What the Cell...

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