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Reproductive Biology

Edited by: Steven Benowitz S.J. Silber, Z.P. Nagy, J. Liu, H. Godoy, P. Devroey, A.C. Van Steirteghem, "Conventional in vitro fertilization versus intracytoplasmic sperm injection for patients requiring microsurgical sperm injection," Human Reproduction, 9:1705-9, 1994. (Cited in more than 50 papers as of October 1996) Comments by Sherman J. Silber, St. Luke's Hospital, St. Louis For years, one of the most frustrating causes of male infertility was the congenital absence of the vas deferens,

The Scientist Staff

Edited by: Steven Benowitz
S.J. Silber, Z.P. Nagy, J. Liu, H. Godoy, P. Devroey, A.C. Van Steirteghem, "Conventional in vitro fertilization versus intracytoplasmic sperm injection for patients requiring microsurgical sperm injection," Human Reproduction, 9:1705-9, 1994. (Cited in more than 50 papers as of October 1996)

Comments by Sherman J. Silber, St. Luke's Hospital, St. Louis

For years, one of the most frustrating causes of male infertility was the congenital absence of the vas deferens, in addition to other irreparable obstructions. Affected men usually can make sperm, but the sperm have no way of leaving the epididymis and reaching the egg. Doctors can remove sperm from the epididymis-a long, coiled microscopic tube that carries sperm from the testicle to the vas deferens-for in vitro fertilization. However, success rates in the past for the procedure have been poor.


PIONEER: Sherman Silber of St. Luke's Hospital developed a technique to...

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