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Signal Transduction

Y. Kamei, L. Xu, T. Heinzel, J. Torchia, R. Kurokawa, B. Gloss, S.C. Lin, R.A. Heyman, D.W. Rose, C.K. Glass. "A CBP integrator complex mediates transcriptional activation and AP-1 inhibition by nuclear receptors," Cell, 85:403-14, 1996. (Cited in more than 400 papers since publication) Chris Glass Comments Chris Glass, associate professor of medicine at the University of California at San Diego There's a whole lot going on in the nucleus of the cell. Genes are transcribed into complement

The Scientist Staff

Y. Kamei, L. Xu, T. Heinzel, J. Torchia, R. Kurokawa, B. Gloss, S.C. Lin, R.A. Heyman, D.W. Rose, C.K. Glass. "A CBP integrator complex mediates transcriptional activation and AP-1 inhibition by nuclear receptors," Cell, 85:403-14, 1996. (Cited in more than 400 papers since publication)


Chris Glass
Comments Chris Glass, associate professor of medicine at the University of California at San Diego

There's a whole lot going on in the nucleus of the cell. Genes are transcribed into complementary DNA and then translated to messenger RNA to carry instructions to the protein-building machinery, while extracellular signals initiate promoters that begin the transcription process. And all the while, balance is maintained between conflicting signals to maintain equilibrium within the cell.

Take, for example, two classes of proteins that initiate gene expression through direct binding to DNA: nuclear receptors and activation protein 1 (AP-1), which is composed of proteins that include...

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