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The Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Mark F. Pittenger, director of discovery research at Osiris Therapeutics. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. M.F. Pittenger, A.M. Mackay, S.C. Beck, R.K. Jaiswal, R. Douglas, J.D. Mosca, M.A. Moorman, D.W. Simonetti, S. Craig, D.R. Marshak, "Multilineage potential of adult human mesenchymal stem cells," Science, 284:143-7, April 2,

Eugene Russo
For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Mark F. Pittenger, director of discovery research at Osiris Therapeutics. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

M.F. Pittenger, A.M. Mackay, S.C. Beck, R.K. Jaiswal, R. Douglas, J.D. Mosca, M.A. Moorman, D.W. Simonetti, S. Craig, D.R. Marshak, "Multilineage potential of adult human mesenchymal stem cells," Science, 284:143-7, April 2, 1999. (Cited in 145 papers)



Mark F. Pittenger (left), Alastair Mackay (right)



In 1999, investigators at Osiris Therapeutics in Baltimore arguably accomplished a major first in stem cell research. Using the right recipe of experimental ingredients and conditions, they coaxed human bone marrow cells into three separate cell lineages.1 "A bunch of people said, 'Oh, this had been done before,'" comments lead author Mark F. Pittenger. "People had...

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