The Role of BRCA1 in Breast Cancer

For this article, Leslie Pray interviewed Chu-Xia Deng, senior investigator, Genetics of Development and Disease Branch of the National Institutes of Health. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. X.L. Xu, Z. Weaver, S.P. Linke, C.L. Li, J. Gotay, X.W. Wang, C.C. Harris, T. Ried, C.X. Deng, "Centrosome amplification and a defective G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint induce genetic inst

Leslie Pray
Jun 10, 2001
For this article, Leslie Pray interviewed Chu-Xia Deng, senior investigator, Genetics of Development and Disease Branch of the National Institutes of Health. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

X.L. Xu, Z. Weaver, S.P. Linke, C.L. Li, J. Gotay, X.W. Wang, C.C. Harris, T. Ried, C.X. Deng, "Centrosome amplification and a defective G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint induce genetic instability in BRCA1 exon 11 isoform-deficient cells," Molecular Cell, 3:389-95, March 1999. (Cited in 103 papers)



Ever since researchers first linked the breast tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 to familial breast cancer1 nearly a decade ago, the gene has been a hot topic in cancer biology. Until recently, however, its actual function remained elusive. Chu-Xia Deng, senior investigator at the Genetics of Development and Disease Branch of...

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