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Virology

Edited by: Paul Smaglik T.P. Leary, A.S. Muerhoff, J.N. Simons, T.J. Pilot-Matias, J.C. Erker, M.L. Chalmers, G.G. Schlauder, G.J. Dawson, S.M. Desai, I.K. Mushahwar, "Sequence and genomic organization of GBV-C: A novel member of the Flaviviridae associated with human non-A-E hepatitis," Journal of Medical Virology, 48:60-7, 1996. (Cited more than 150 times since its publication in January 1996) Comments by Thomas P. Leary and Isa K. Mushahwar, Virus Discovery Group, Abbott Laboratories Inc.,

Paul Smaglik

Edited by: Paul Smaglik
T.P. Leary, A.S. Muerhoff, J.N. Simons, T.J. Pilot-Matias, J.C. Erker, M.L. Chalmers, G.G. Schlauder, G.J. Dawson, S.M. Desai, I.K. Mushahwar, "Sequence and genomic organization of GBV-C: A novel member of the Flaviviridae associated with human non-A-E hepatitis," Journal of Medical Virology, 48:60-7, 1996. (Cited more than 150 times since its publication in January 1996)

Comments by Thomas P. Leary and Isa K. Mushahwar, Virus Discovery Group, Abbott Laboratories Inc., North Chicago, Ill.


VIRAL SURPRISE: Abbott Laboratories' Thomas Leary was looking for GBV-A or GBV-B in a human sample but found GBV-C instead.

UNKNOWN IMPACT: Since GBV-C rarely occurs alone, scientists will have a difficult time assessing its contribution to hepatitis, says Abbott Laboratories' Isa Mushahwar.
Ten percent to 20 percent of human hepatitis cases are of unknown origin. Scientists suspected that GB virus A (GBV-A) and GB virus B (GBV-B), two viruses found only...

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