When Brain Becomes Blood

For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Christopher R.R. Bjornson, a graduate student in the department of biochemistry at the University of Washington in Seattle. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. C.R.R. Bjornson, R.L. Rietze, B.A. Reynolds, M.C. Magli, A.L. Vescovi, "Turning brain into blood: A hematopoietic fate adopted by adult neural stem cells in vivo,"Science, 283

Eugene Russo
May 27, 2001
For this article, Eugene Russo interviewed Christopher R.R. Bjornson, a graduate student in the department of biochemistry at the University of Washington in Seattle. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

C.R.R. Bjornson, R.L. Rietze, B.A. Reynolds, M.C. Magli, A.L. Vescovi, "Turning brain into blood: A hematopoietic fate adopted by adult neural stem cells in vivo,"Science, 283:534-7, Jan. 22, 1999. (Cited in 150 papers)



In 1998, a fledgling stem cell biotech venture called NeuroSpheres Ltd. narrowly missed a lucrative window of opportunity. In June of that year, the Calgary-based company went out of business, due in part to dwindling venture capital. Just a few months later, published findings by Johns Hopkins University professor John Gearhart and University of Wisconsin professor James Thomson helped...

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