Women's Health Research / Breast Cancer

Edited by: Karen Young Kreeger REAL RISKS: Harvard’s Graham Colditz found a higher risk of breast cancer in women who took estrogen and progestin. G.A. Colditz, S.E. Hankinson, D.J. Hunter, W.C. Willett, J.E. Manson, M.J. Stampfer, C. Hennekens, B. Rosner, F.E. Speizer, "The use of estrogens and progestins and the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women," New England Journal of Medicine, 332:1589-93, 1995. (Cited in nearly 140 publications as of December 1996) Comments by Graham

The Scientist Staff
Feb 2, 1997

Edited by: Karen Young Kreeger


REAL RISKS: Harvard’s Graham Colditz found a higher risk of breast cancer in women who took estrogen and progestin.
G.A. Colditz, S.E. Hankinson, D.J. Hunter, W.C. Willett, J.E. Manson, M.J. Stampfer, C. Hennekens, B. Rosner, F.E. Speizer, "The use of estrogens and progestins and the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women," New England Journal of Medicine, 332:1589-93, 1995. (Cited in nearly 140 publications as of December 1996)

Comments by Graham A. Colditz, Harvard Medical School

This paper has its roots in the pioneering days of women's health research. It began with the Nurse's Health Study, a prospective investigation of 121,000 women begun in 1976 to examine the relationship between contraceptives and breast cancer. In 1978 the study's aims were broadened to include the use of hormones administered to postmenopausal women and its relationship to breast and other cancers.

The goal of...

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