A fluorescence micrograph showing antibody-secreting mouse lymphocytes in white and conduits made of collagen in green
A fluorescence micrograph showing antibody-secreting mouse lymphocytes in white and conduits made of collagen in green

Image of the Day: Pipelines

Collagen tunnels through mouse lymph nodes ferry antibodies into the bloodstream.

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Shawna Williams

Shawna joined The Scientist in 2017 and is now a senior editor and interim news editor. She holds a bachelor's degree in biochemistry from Colorado College and a graduate certificate...

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Nov 19, 2018

ABOVE: A fluorescence micrograph showing antibody-secreting mouse lymphocytes in white and conduits made of collagen in green
© G. THIERRY

Tunnels made of collagen run through lymph nodes, drawing infection-fighting antibodies away from the cells that secrete them and into the bloodstream, a new study in mice reports. The results, which appeared November 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, give insight into how lymph nodes release antibodies.

G.R. Thierry et al., “The conduit system exports locally secreted IgM from lymph nodes,” J Exp Med, doi:10.1084/jem.20180344, 2018.

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A fluorescence micrograph showing antibody-secreting mouse lymphocytes in white and conduits made of collagen in green

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