ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Image of the Day: Bee Bot

Developers made an insect-like robot with two pairs of wings.

Chia-Yi Hou
The flying, insect-inspired robot
NOAH T. JAFFERIS AND E. FARRELL HELBLING, HARVARD MICROROBOTICS LABORATORY

An insect-like robot can fly untethered—for about half a second—by flapping its four wings to generate lift, researchers reported in Nature on June 26. The device, called Robobee, is less than 5 cm long and weighs 259 mg. It uses solar cells to power its flight, but requires light that is more than three times the intensity of the sun on Earth’s surface to generate enough power. The robot is light enough to carry its own power supply in future flight experiments.

N.T. Jafferis et al., “Untethered flight of an insect-sized flapping-wing microscale aerial vehicle,” Nature, doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1322-0, 2019.

Interested in reading more?

robobee insect robot flying untethered Harvard microrobotics micro robotics mini robots

The Scientist ARCHIVES

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT