Image of the Day
Image of the Day: Fluorescent Neurons
Image of the Day: Fluorescent Neurons
The Scientist Staff | May 13, 2013
The nerve cells of model organism Caenorhabitis elegans stained with green fluorescent protein.
Image of the Day: Corn Stomates
Image of the Day: Corn Stomates
The Scientist Staff | May 10, 2013
Small openings in leaves allow plants to exchange gases and water vapor with the atmosphere.
Image of the Day: Survival Mode
Image of the Day: Survival Mode
The Scientist Staff | May 9, 2013
Starving Bacillus subtilis bacteria prepare to produce spores that will ride out tough times by dividing into uneven parts (fluorescently labeled pink and yellow).
Image of the Day: Defense from Disease
Image of the Day: Defense from Disease
The Scientist Staff | May 8, 2013
A white blood cell (purple) engulfs Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (yellow).
Image of the Day: Donald Trump Caterpillar
Image of the Day: Donald Trump Caterpillar
The Scientist Staff | May 7, 2013
The flannel moth caterpillar Megalopyge opercularis sports hair-like venomous spines and, according to some, bears an uncanny resemblance to a walking toupee.
Image of the Day: Microbial Corkscrews
Image of the Day: Microbial Corkscrews
The Scientist Staff | May 6, 2013
An electron micrograph of highly infectious bacteria from the Leptospira genus
Image of the Day: Endangered Butterfly
Image of the Day: Endangered Butterfly
The Scientist Staff | May 3, 2013
Karner blue butterflies, first described by Vladimir Nabokov, depend on wild lupine to survive in their larval form.
Image of the Day: Tangled Genes
Image of the Day: Tangled Genes
The Scientist Staff | May 2, 2013
A simulation of the conformation of human chromosome 19, based on knowledge of co-regulated gene pairs.
Image of the Day: Self-Cleaning Trachea
Image of the Day: Self-Cleaning Trachea
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2013
Cells covered in tiny, hair-like cilia clear foreign substances from the respiratory tract.
Image of the Day: Acrobatic Damselflies
Image of the Day: Acrobatic Damselflies
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2013
During mating, a male damselfly holds a female behind her head while she loops her abdomen forward to pick up sperm that he has deposited in a secondary sexual organ.