Image of the Day: It’s a Shark!
Image of the Day: It’s a Shark!
A newly developed underwater ultrasound reveals a fetal shark swimming between the two uteri of its mother.
Image of the Day: It’s a Shark!
Image of the Day: It’s a Shark!

A newly developed underwater ultrasound reveals a fetal shark swimming between the two uteri of its mother.

A newly developed underwater ultrasound reveals a fetal shark swimming between the two uteri of its mother.

Image of the Day
Image of the Day: Embryo in Blue
Image of the Day: Embryo in Blue
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 7, 2019
A bright blue stain highlights the sensory nerves of a developing mouse embryo.
Image of the Day: Nature by Hand Image of the Day: Nature by Hand
Image of the Day: Nature by Hand
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 4, 2019
Scientist D. Allan Drummond’s study of life in sculpture aims to provoke curiosity and wonder about the world.
Image of the Day: In Sync
Image of the Day: In Sync
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 3, 2019
At playtime together, parents’ brain activity mimics that of their infant children.
Image of the Day: Light Salve
Image of the Day: Light Salve
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 2, 2019
Researchers used infrared light to relieve itchy mice.
Image of the Day: Shoots Up
Image of the Day: Shoots Up
Ashley Yeager | Dec 14, 2018
During plants’ cell division, mother cells give daughter cells a signal to show them which way is up.
Image of the Day: Blood and Guts
Image of the Day: Blood and Guts
Carolyn Wilke | Dec 13, 2018
Researchers find that stem cells in the human intestine may provide up to 10 percent of circulating blood cells.
Image of the Day: Bad Behavior
Image of the Day: Bad Behavior
Kerry Grens | Dec 12, 2018
A deep learning program can identify cells with higher metastatic potential based on the way they look and move.
Image of the Day: Cellular Destiny
Image of the Day: Cellular Destiny
Carolyn Wilke | Dec 11, 2018
Progenitor cells in the pancreas of humans get developmental cues from proteins in their environment.
Image of the Day: Gut Bomb
Image of the Day: Gut Bomb
Catherine Offord | Dec 10, 2018
Microbial species living in a fruit fly gut interact with one another—and influence the insect’s health and longevity in the process.