Calcium and the Pancreas

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. 

Ole H. Petersen, Oleg V. Gerasimenko, and Julia V. Gerasimenko
Feb 1, 2012

Infographic: Calcium and the Pancreas
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ANDREW SWIFT

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. When food is eaten, low concentrations of the pancreas-stimulating hormone cholecystokinin or of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine cause brief, localized spikes in calcium concentration within the specialized cells. But sustained global elevations of Ca2+ concentration in these cells—caused by elevated hormone or neurotransmitter levels—spell trouble.

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Calcium and the Pancreas

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