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literature infographic
brain tissue

Infographic: A 3-D Printed Brain Tumor

How researchers create a glioblastoma on a chip that can predict patients’ response to treatments

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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A chamber wall is printed with silicon-based bioink on a sterile glass slide (1). Within this chamber, a mixture of human vascular cells derived from umbilical cords and decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) from a pig’s brain is printed in a ring (2). Finally, a third bioink, containing porcine ECM combined with glioblastoma (GBM) cells taken from a patient’s resected tumor, fills in the ring (3). After a week of growth in a cell culture incubator, the model is ready to be used to screen various therapy options.

© Kelly Finan

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