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Pooling resources

Related Articles Tips for choosing a microscope setup Going Live How it Works: Two-Photon Microscopy Prioritizing speed Mix and match Deep down view Sticking to the surface User: Lynne Coluccio, a cell biologist at Boston Biomedical Research Institute, Watertown, Mass. Project: Structure and function of the unconventional (nonmuscle) myosin, myo-1c, expressed in the hair cells of the inner ear. Problem: Unless a lab focuses primarily on imaging, few researche

Alla Katsnelson

User: Lynne Coluccio, a cell biologist at Boston Biomedical Research Institute, Watertown, Mass.

Project: Structure and function of the unconventional (nonmuscle) myosin, myo-1c, expressed in the hair cells of the inner ear.

Problem: Unless a lab focuses primarily on imaging, few researchers without a generous startup package can afford a specialized microscope, which can cost between $250,000 and $600,000.

<figcaption>Two confocal sections of HeLA cells expressing GFP actin. Credit: Alena Lieto-Trivedi and Lynne Coluccio</figcaption>
Two confocal sections of HeLA cells expressing GFP actin. Credit: Alena Lieto-Trivedi and Lynne Coluccio

Solution: Coluccio and nine colleagues applied for a National Institutes of Health grant to cover a shared setup. Projects range from calcium signaling in muscle to cancer cell interactions, so the group decided on a spinning-disk confocal microscope, which can image on both a short- and long-time scale. "Conventional...

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