Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

Outsourcing is still the rule and data analysis, the bottleneck.

Christi Bird
Oct 31, 2014

In May, The Scientist, in collaboration with Frost & Sullivan, an international market intelligence and consulting firm, conducted a brief survey of our readers about their use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. The majority of NGS work is focused on disease-related and basic research. While only 40% of respondents perform in-house NGS, that percentage is expected to increase by 4% in the next year. Half of those surveyed plan to perform RNA-Seq in the next two years. The most significant bottleneck in NGS workflow is the length of time spent analyzing and interpreting data, with 32% of the respondents outsourcing the work to in-house bioinformatics colleagues or third-party companies.
—Christi Bird, Senior Industry Analyst, Life Sciences, Frost & Sullivan

All figures are rounded

 

TIME ALLOTMENT: The most significant bottleneck in NGS workflow is the length of time spent analyzing data. A quarter of researchers surveyed report that performing...

NGS SOFTWARE ANALYSIS BUDGETS: In-house annual budgets for NGS data-interpretation software are more than double the amount spent by those who outsource. While the overall average budget for NGS software is approximately $8,500, this figure masks the dramatic differences between in-house (from $13,000 to $14,000) and outsourced (from $4,500 to $6,300) NGS data analysis. (Interpolated Mean Scores) (Global, 2014)