ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Philippa Marrack

The Scientist Date: November 25, 1996 THE SCIENTIST® The Newspaper for the Life Sciences Professional "Because of the way THE SCIENTIST is formatted, I can glean a lot from it quickly. There are a lot of interesting topics and ideas presented in brief. And that's something I appreciate because of my hectic schedule." Philippa Marrack Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Jewish Center, Denver Throughout their scientific careers, Philippa Marrack and John Kappler, husband and wife

The Scientist Staff

The Scientist

Date: November 25, 1996


THE SCIENTIST®

The Newspaper for the Life Sciences Professional
"Because of the way THE SCIENTIST is formatted, I can glean a lot from it quickly. There are a lot of interesting topics and ideas presented in brief. And that's something I appreciate because of my hectic schedule."

Philippa Marrack
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Jewish Center, Denver

Throughout their scientific careers, Philippa Marrack and John Kappler, husband and wife immunology researchers, have focused their work on T cells. In recent years, their research has increased our knowledge of how T cells recognize antigens in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins.

"The MHC proteins are the most polymorphic proteins that exist in humans. They control graft rejection and respond to infection and autoimmunity. They have a huge effect on human health and disease," notes Marrack.

Since their discovery of the T-cell receptors...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT