AIDS And Anti-Science

Lead articles in the July 10, 1995, issue of The Scientist include one on anti-science (F. Hoke, "Scientists See Broad Attack Against Research And Reason," page 1) and another on science-on-science (B. Goodman, "Massive NIH AIDS Priority Review Panel Begins Work Against A Daunting Schedule," page 1). Last year, the American people spent $1 billion on microwave popcorn, and the $8.4 billion in annual sales of home computers exceeded the $8 billion in annual sales of television sets for the firs

Robert Trelstad
Jan 7, 1996
Lead articles in the July 10, 1995, issue of The Scientist include one on anti-science (F. Hoke, "Scientists See Broad Attack Against Research And Reason," page 1) and another on science-on-science (B. Goodman, "Massive NIH AIDS Priority Review Panel Begins Work Against A Daunting Schedule," page 1).

Last year, the American people spent $1 billion on microwave popcorn, and the $8.4 billion in annual sales of home computers exceeded the $8 billion in annual sales of television sets for the first time. Earlier this year the National Institutes of Health budget was rescued from the anti-science Congress of the United States.

If the world is to be seen only through the "gauzy filter" of culture, then let us test the consequences of that approach. The committee should recommend that we stop all research on AIDS until society deems it a real event. In that we spend nearly six...