Animal Research

Adrian Morrison's Opinion (The Scientist, Aug. 19, 1996, page 11) that focuses on possible distortions in Peter Singer's book Animal Liberation [New York, New York Review/Random House, reissued 1990] fails to address Singer's and many others' (including scientists') concerns about some research that is conducted on nonhuman animals. What Morrison does not discuss, and it is the major issue with which many people are concerned, is that some research on nonhuman animals is questionable, not only

Marc Bekoff
Nov 24, 1996

Adrian Morrison's Opinion (The Scientist, Aug. 19, 1996, page 11) that focuses on possible distortions in Peter Singer's book Animal Liberation [New York, New York Review/Random House, reissued 1990] fails to address Singer's and many others' (including scientists') concerns about some research that is conducted on nonhuman animals. What Morrison does not discuss, and it is the major issue with which many people are concerned, is that some research on nonhuman animals is questionable, not only because of the methods that are used and the questions that are asked, but also because of its effect-the pain and suffering-on the nonconsenting nonhuman animal subjects. Even for those who support nonhuman animal experimentation, isn't it possible that there are some experiments that need to be discussed further and possibly modified or stopped?

Morrison sidesteps what Singer and others want to discuss openly-why are nonhuman animals being used in a...

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