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Astrology Lives

Astrology Lives Apparently bewildered why anyone would believe in astrology Robert P. Crease wonders why more scientists do not rise to fight it. Perhaps I can explain why astrology thrives in spite of scientific refutation. There really is no profound conflict, only the superficial appearance of one. Science challenges what it sees as the underlying mechanism of astrology, namely that the stars/planets govern our lives. To advocates of astrology, such concerns are too ir relevant to have an

Donald Windsor

Astrology Lives

Apparently bewildered why anyone would believe in astrology Robert P. Crease wonders why more scientists do not rise to fight it. Perhaps I can explain why astrology thrives in spite of scientific refutation.

There really is no profound conflict, only the superficial appearance of one. Science challenges what it sees as the underlying mechanism of astrology, namely that the stars/planets govern our lives. To advocates of astrology, such concerns are too ir relevant to have any real meaning. At issue are the events in our lives—the people we meet, the destiny we seek. Since no one knows the future, we all—scientists and astrologers—try to plan our moves on a playing field that is constantly changing and surprising us. Everybody—scientists included—has luck; some good, some bad. Luck is’a major factorin our lives, yet is an element over which we have no control. What astrology (or for that matter also...

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