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Creationism is a Sound Science

I find the claims of both Gould and Ayala, that evolution is fact, outrageous (The Scientist, November 17, 1986, pp. 10-11). The very foundation of evolution, which assumes that order and complexity evolved from chaos, contravenes science. The second law of thermodynamics dictates that order spontaneously gives way to chaos as time proceeds. Consider the DNA molecule. Evolutionists postulate that the first nucleic acids formed in the primeval oceans, which were rich in organic compounds. The sta

Mw Bredenkamp
I find the claims of both Gould and Ayala, that evolution is fact, outrageous (The Scientist, November 17, 1986, pp. 10-11). The very foundation of evolution, which assumes that order and complexity evolved from chaos, contravenes science. The second law of thermodynamics dictates that order spontaneously gives way to chaos as time proceeds. Consider the DNA molecule. Evolutionists postulate that the first nucleic acids formed in the primeval oceans, which were rich in organic compounds. The statistical chance of having the right sequence of nucleotides to form even the simplest DNA molecule is less than remote.

Assuming that the DNA did form in this way, what value would it have in a hostile environment and in the absence of a cellular medium containing enzymes necessary to read and manipulate the DNA? Ironically, enzymes are derived from the DNA. While intraspecies evolution can be seen taking place in...

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