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Creationism is Bad Science, Bad Theology, Too

There is another aspect to scientific creationism (The Scientist, November 17, 1986, pp.10-11) that nobody seems to mention. The obvious aim of the fundamentalism-oriented scientific creationists is to combat atheism. In this endeavor, they render great disservice to science because they identify evolutionary science with atheism. This is well known. What is being missed, however, is that they also render great disservice to sound theology as well. Jean Danielou, S.J., a scripture scholar, state

Andrew Szebenyi
There is another aspect to scientific creationism (The Scientist, November 17, 1986, pp.10-11) that nobody seems to mention. The obvious aim of the fundamentalism-oriented scientific creationists is to combat atheism. In this endeavor, they render great disservice to science because they identify evolutionary science with atheism. This is well known. What is being missed, however, is that they also render great disservice to sound theology as well.

Jean Danielou, S.J., a scripture scholar, states in his book In the Beginning... (Helicon, 1965), an exegetical study of the first three chapters of Genesis, that the theological aim of these chapters was the demythologization of all contemporary polytheistic religious influences on the Jewish people. The statement of Genesis is that there is but one God who is the creator of all else. The Babylonian goddess Tiamat becomes simply the created ocean, and Marduk, the god of light, is just light brought...

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