Evelyn Fox Keller Objects To Editor's Title

I was shocked and dismayed at the headline, or title, attached to my article in the October 15 issue of The Scientist [page 15]. The title not only was different from my original title--"Issues of Sex and Gender in the Pursuit of Science"--but entirely contrary to the meaning of my article, as it was, indeed, to all my efforts over the past decade. If there is a single point on which all feminist scholarship over the past decade has converged, it is the importance of recognizing the social con

Evelyn Fox Keller
Jan 6, 1991
I was shocked and dismayed at the headline, or title, attached to my article in the October 15 issue of The Scientist [page 15]. The title not only was different from my original title--"Issues of Sex and Gender in the Pursuit of Science"--but entirely contrary to the meaning of my article, as it was, indeed, to all my efforts over the past decade.

If there is a single point on which all feminist scholarship over the past decade has converged, it is the importance of recognizing the social construction of gender, and the deeply oppressive consequences of assuming that men and women are, in Simone de Beauvoir's words, "born rather than made." All of my work on gender and science proceeds from this basic recognition. My endeavor has been to call attention to the ways in which the social construction of a binary opposition between "masculine" and "feminine" has influenced...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?