Genes and Microgravity

I was the commander of the STS-90 Neurolab Space Shuttle mission.1 Even with a background as an engineer, test pilot, and pilot astronaut and not in the life sciences, I continue to be astounded by the incredible potential of the Neurolab results to benefit people on earth. Your article highlights yet another stellar experiment aboard the last and most scientifically productive of the 25 Spacelab missions NASA flew. As we transition to science operations aboard the International Space Station i

Richard Searfoss
Oct 10, 1999

I was the commander of the STS-90 Neurolab Space Shuttle mission.1 Even with a background as an engineer, test pilot, and pilot astronaut and not in the life sciences, I continue to be astounded by the incredible potential of the Neurolab results to benefit people on earth. Your article highlights yet another stellar experiment aboard the last and most scientifically productive of the 25 Spacelab missions NASA flew. As we transition to science operations aboard the International Space Station in the years to come, the ability to manipulate the gravity variable will continue to offer profound and as of yet unconsidered research opportunities. Serendipity is certainly alive and well in space exploration, with the potential scientific harvest limited only by the imagination. Thanks again for the intriguing article, which added to my sense of pride and accomplishment at being part of the Neurolab team.

Richard A. Searfoss
Orlando, FL...

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