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Letter: Crisis Or Trivia?

Judging from his letter to The Scientist (April 2, 1990, page 18), Daniel L. Diaz misconstrued what I was trying to say in my article, "Suggestions For Saving Your Time - And Keeping Your Cool" (The Scientist, Feb. 19, 1990, page 24). I think it goes without saying that if a student has a serious problem or is facing a crisis situation - illness, a death in the family - the human element takes precedence and an administrator should indeed take the time to discuss the situation. Such events are

Liane Reif-lehrer

Judging from his letter to The Scientist (April 2, 1990, page 18), Daniel L. Diaz misconstrued what I was trying to say in my article, "Suggestions For Saving Your Time - And Keeping Your Cool" (The Scientist, Feb. 19, 1990, page 24). I think it goes without saying that if a student has a serious problem or is facing a crisis situation - illness, a death in the family - the human element takes precedence and an administrator should indeed take the time to discuss the situation. Such events are not trivial by any humane definition.

On the other hand, many things can indeed be put off for a few hours or even longer. A student's difficulty with another person or the problem of finding an apartment can certainly wait until another day - or at least until the end of a working day.

It is a simple...

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