Letter: Who Doesn't Understand?

This time, though, there is a twist. All this fuss about the environment, she complains, is the product of so much bad journalism. Americans are being duped, she argues, and they will continue to be "until the media stop quoting charlatans and quacks, and until respected scientists speak up." "There was a time when experts were believed," she laments. "It was a time of optimism and progress." But alas, she says, the media today tend to quote the misfits of our profession, scientists who "have

Michael Guillen
May 27, 1990
This time, though, there is a twist. All this fuss about the environment, she complains, is the product of so much bad journalism. Americans are being duped, she argues, and they will continue to be "until the media stop quoting charlatans and quacks, and until respected scientists speak up."

"There was a time when experts were believed," she laments. "It was a time of optimism and progress." But alas, she says, the media today tend to quote the misfits of our profession, scientists who "have a mission or `cause.' " If only the public had a chance to listen to "respected" scientists - whatever that means - people would see the error of their ways, and live happily ever after.

That may be Ray's idea of a solution to our environmental woes, but as they say in the mass media: "I don't think it'll play in Peoria." Here are some...

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