Letters

In the last several years there has been an increasing chorus of voices trying to convince us that there was some good after all in the work of the Nazi scientists who participated in the concentration camp medical experiments. This new breed of apologist claims to have exhumed from among the bones, so to speak, of the holocaust victims some gems of scientific research which will benefit mankind. Alan Nixon's recent essay (The Scientist, November 14, page 9) is the latest contribution in that

Edmund Glaser
Jan 8, 1989

In the last several years there has been an increasing chorus of voices trying to convince us that there was some good after all in the work of the Nazi scientists who participated in the concentration camp medical experiments. This new breed of apologist claims to have exhumed from among the bones, so to speak, of the holocaust victims some gems of scientific research which will benefit mankind. Alan Nixon's recent essay (The Scientist, November 14, page 9) is the latest contribution in that regard. It is particularly irrational and offensive in its attack on Mr. Lee Thomas and scientists of the EPA who have rightfully resisted attempts to grant these experiments scientific respect.

What is evident is that Nixon has not taken the trouble to read the experiments and does not know the names or the credentials of those who conducted them. Neither does he know any of the...

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