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Liberal Arts Colleges

Linda Marsa's article on science at liberal arts colleges (The Scientist, Nov. 23, 1992, page 21) is quite thorough in outlining the problems and the rewards of teaching and doing research at smaller colleges. However, the accompanying list and comment by Sam Carrier, provost of Oberlin College, that there have been no major changes in the list of the best science-active liberal arts colleges, is short-sighted. An appreciable number of other small liberal arts colleges, besides those on the lis

Elizabeth Weisburger

Linda Marsa's article on science at liberal arts colleges (The Scientist, Nov. 23, 1992, page 21) is quite thorough in outlining the problems and the rewards of teaching and doing research at smaller colleges. However, the accompanying list and comment by Sam Carrier, provost of Oberlin College, that there have been no major changes in the list of the best science-active liberal arts colleges, is short-sighted. An appreciable number of other small liberal arts colleges, besides those on the list--producing a high proportion of science graduates, where professors do independent research, but where good teaching is fundamental--can be found. For example, Nobel Prize winner J. Michael Bishop is a graduate of Gettysburg College. Science graduates of Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pa., have received national honors in their fields. In addition, one graduate was recently named president of the Mathematical Association of America, while another is the new president-elect of the...

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