Live Lectures

A summary of events affecting J. Philippe Rushton that appeared on page 6 of the July 6, 1992, issue of The Scientist claimed that the university's order for Rushton to offer his lectures on videotape was overturned. The article incorrectly stated that "Though university officials said they did it for safety reasons, a London, Ontario, court disagreed and ordered his lectures open to students." The matter was not taken to civil court; hence, there was no court order against the University of We

Emoke Je Szathmary
Sep 13, 1992

A summary of events affecting J. Philippe Rushton that appeared on page 6 of the July 6, 1992, issue of The Scientist claimed that the university's order for Rushton to offer his lectures on videotape was overturned. The article incorrectly stated that "Though university officials said they did it for safety reasons, a London, Ontario, court disagreed and ordered his lectures open to students."

The matter was not taken to civil court; hence, there was no court order against the University of Western Ontario. However, as was his right, Rushton did launch a grievance on the videotape teaching request under the university's internal grievance procedures. The Senate Grievance Committee upheld the university's action, and accepted that the request to teach undergraduates by videotape was reasonable given the threats of physical disruption of Rushton's and others' classes. When it became clear that safety could be ensured in the classroom, Rushton resumed...

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