Mixing Science and Politics

Mixing Science and Politics This article1 seemed to be a well-researched and written update on the action by some European scientists. I understand that the purpose of the article was not to air the motives of those people, but the question begs itself, and intended or not, the message it sends is that the boycotters have high moral ground, that the conflict and bloodshed and suffering in the area are all Israel's doing. Paragraph after paragraph, those activities are examined as perhaps h

Arnold Peckerman
Jul 13, 2003

Mixing Science and Politics


This article1 seemed to be a well-researched and written update on the action by some European scientists. I understand that the purpose of the article was not to air the motives of those people, but the question begs itself, and intended or not, the message it sends is that the boycotters have high moral ground, that the conflict and bloodshed and suffering in the area are all Israel's doing. Paragraph after paragraph, those activities are examined as perhaps harmful to science, but apart from that, the impression one gets is that they are understandable, when in fact, they are either misguided or plain malicious. Voice is given to the likes of Rodney Douglas, preaching self-righteously that "South African academics were much more active in protesting the apartheid government than what I've seen from my Israeli colleagues," in effect calling Israel an apartheid society.

To someone...

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