More on GM Foods

James Huff1 of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences makes a good point on genetically modified (GM) foods. Opposition to GM foods has a long-term political and socially evolutionary implication that must be appreciated before the division of the world scientific community on this issue can be resolved and public acceptance comes willingly. The world is aware that America was the first nation to build the atomic bomb, and yet with all the best intentions it could not stop

Mohan Kokatnur
Jan 9, 2000

James Huff1 of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences makes a good point on genetically modified (GM) foods. Opposition to GM foods has a long-term political and socially evolutionary implication that must be appreciated before the division of the world scientific community on this issue can be resolved and public acceptance comes willingly.

The world is aware that America was the first nation to build the atomic bomb, and yet with all the best intentions it could not stop proliferation of nuclear weapons in the years that have followed. Now the world has seen that for one reason or another the U.S. Congress has considered it wise to quash the test ban treaty even when most of the major powers were willing signatories to the pact. With keen effort, scientific breakthrough, and massive agricultural know-how, the United States is assured of leadership in GM foods. Should America be...

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