More on Hepatitis C

We concur with the letter by Kevin Donnelly1 regarding hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is a far greater problem today than HIV/AIDS. The slow development, possibly decades, of medical problems allows this virus to portray a benign course, which is not the case. Many individuals may be lulled into a sense of security, only to find a devastating, life-threatening illness with slim prognosis. We must educate not only the United States, but also the world about this infectious agent and its sequelae. As

Lm Shecterle
May 23, 1999

We concur with the letter by Kevin Donnelly1 regarding hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is a far greater problem today than HIV/AIDS. The slow development, possibly decades, of medical problems allows this virus to portray a benign course, which is not the case. Many individuals may be lulled into a sense of security, only to find a devastating, life-threatening illness with slim prognosis. We must educate not only the United States, but also the world about this infectious agent and its sequelae.

As of today, the treatments for this disease have had mixed results; not all patients have experienced favorable outcomes. Specifically, some genotypes of this virus have shown, at best, marginal efficacy upon the use of accepted pharmaceutical treatment regimens. Not only must education on this illness be broadened, but a more open-minded view to other potential therapies must also be realized.

Anecdotal cases involving whole-body hyperthermia have revealed...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?