Network Of Emerging Scientists

In the article entitled "Scientists' Heated Debate On Immigration Mirrors Issues Argued Throughout U.S." (R. Finn, The Scientist, Nov. 27, 1995, page 1), Gene Nelson is incorrectly referred to as a founding member of the Network of Emerging Scientists (NES). While Nelson is a valued member of the NES editors' group and a frequent contributor to the NES digest, he be-came active in our group after its inception. In addition, while reference to NES was made in the context of the immigration deb

Mark Haynes
Apr 1, 1996
In the article entitled "Scientists' Heated Debate On Immigration Mirrors Issues Argued Throughout U.S." (R. Finn,

The Scientist, Nov. 27, 1995, page 1), Gene Nelson is incorrectly referred to as a founding member of the Network of Emerging Scientists (NES). While Nelson is a valued member of the NES editors' group and a frequent contributor to the NES digest, he be-came active in our group after its inception.

In addition, while reference to NES was made in the context of the immigration debate, our charter is much broader. As such, we are concerned that some statements in the article might cause your readers to misconstrue the nature and origin of this group.

NES was founded as a vehicle for open discussion and level-headed activism regarding national science policy, scientific infrastructure, science education, and a number of other issues like immigration that not only concern emerging scientists but also may affect...

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