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NIH Support

The story in the May 29, 1995, issue of The Scientist on the newly elected members of the National Academy of Sciences, "Howard Hughes Institute Makes A Big Showing In 1995 Class of NAS Members" [K.Y. Kreeger, page 3] neglected to note the significant role played by the National Institutes of Health in supporting the research of many of the new NAS members. Each year, a large number of new NAS members are NIH grantees or intramural scientists. This year, for example, 13 of the 60 new members ar

Marvin Cassman
The story in the May 29, 1995, issue of The Scientist on the newly elected members of the National Academy of Sciences, "Howard Hughes Institute Makes A Big Showing In 1995 Class of NAS Members" [K.Y. Kreeger, page 3] neglected to note the significant role played by the National Institutes of Health in supporting the research of many of the new NAS members. Each year, a large number of new NAS members are NIH grantees or intramural scientists. This year, for example, 13 of the 60 new members are current grantees of one component of NIH alone, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS).

NIGMS support--in some cases extending back more than 30 years--helped these scientists make the discoveries for which they are now being honored. Several of the scientists who were featured in your article--including Judith Kimble, Douglas A. Melton, and Stuart L. Schreiber--are longtime NIGMS grantees as...

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