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Not Right, Not Left, But Backward

As I read the recent article in The Scientist entitled "Neuroscience: A Personal Perspective,"1 I was struck by the textural effects in the accompanying graphic. However, there was something disquieting about the image, as well. As I pondered it further, I realized that the radiograph of the skull and the drawing of the brain that it contained did not quite fit; they were facing in opposite directions. Neuroscientists, at times, need to be able to change their thinking 180 degrees to see soluti

Samuel Saporta

As I read the recent article in The Scientist entitled "Neuroscience: A Personal Perspective,"1 I was struck by the textural effects in the accompanying graphic. However, there was something disquieting about the image, as well. As I pondered it further, I realized that the radiograph of the skull and the drawing of the brain that it contained did not quite fit; they were facing in opposite directions. Neuroscientists, at times, need to be able to change their thinking 180 degrees to see solutions to current problems. This graphic will always serve to remind me of that invaluable skill.

Samuel Saporta, Ph.D.
Department of Anatomy
USF College of Medicine
12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33612

Editor's Response: We could say we were trying to see if you were paying attention ... but we won't. Though the graphic was intended to be a conceptual piece of art and not...

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