On Science And Religion

William Provine takes the extreme point of view that people (implying particularly scientists) who practice religion must check their brains at the church door. His view seems to be that a scientist cannot justify believing both in religion and in scientific principles, including evolution. I take exception with Provine’s point of view. Religion is a very personal set of beliefs. It is no more right for Provine to thrust his atheism on readers than for the Pope to force people to his poi

John Mcglone
Oct 16, 1988

William Provine takes the extreme point of view that people (implying particularly scientists) who practice religion must check their brains at the church door. His view seems to be that a scientist cannot justify believing both in religion and in scientific principles, including evolution.

I take exception with Provine’s point of view. Religion is a very personal set of beliefs. It is no more right for Provine to thrust his atheism on readers than for the Pope to force people to his point of view. And, Provine doesn’t get the point. The foundation of religion is faith in unveriflable events; the foundation of science is faith in what we believe are verifiable events. It makes no sense to subject religion to tests of fact or to have faith in unveriflable events of science.

JOHN J. McGLONE
Assistant Professor
College of Agricultural Sciences
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, Texas 79409

William Provine...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?