One Is Not Enough

Why is it that after sequencing one genome, many people keep stating we now know "the location and sequence of every gene in the genome"?1 I do not wish to take away anything from the gargantuan efforts and brilliant achievements of the many researchers around the world, but one genome is not exactly telling us all we need to know. We have made a great stride forward, but we cannot exactly sit back and enjoy the fruits of our labors. There is such a thing as genetic variability and that has not

Nick Henriquez
Jul 8, 2001
Why is it that after sequencing one genome, many people keep stating we now know "the location and sequence of every gene in the genome"?1 I do not wish to take away anything from the gargantuan efforts and brilliant achievements of the many researchers around the world, but one genome is not exactly telling us all we need to know.

We have made a great stride forward, but we cannot exactly sit back and enjoy the fruits of our labors. There is such a thing as genetic variability and that has not been addressed by the Human Genome Project. Furthermore, we still haven't got much more of a clue about the function/regulation of many of the genes. Nor have we addressed the disparity between the number of cDNA transcripts and number of open reading frames found on the genome amalgam that has been sequenced.

I would like people to...

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