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Physics Dissidents

I appreciated your article on physics dissidents (B. Goodman, The Scientist, May 15, 1995, page 3). It was good, balanced coverage. The "dissidents" are mainly in the wrong, but, as Lewis Epstein was quoted in the article, "they have their heart in the right place," and seem to be very energetic. In such a case, they deserve more expression rather than censorship. Generally, too much control over ideas tends to legitimize even bad ideas. After all, why is it necessary to squelch weak ideas? C

John Winterle
I appreciated your article on physics dissidents (B. Goodman, The Scientist, May 15, 1995, page 3). It was good, balanced coverage.

The "dissidents" are mainly in the wrong, but, as Lewis Epstein was quoted in the article, "they have their heart in the right place," and seem to be very energetic. In such a case, they deserve more expression rather than censorship.

Generally, too much control over ideas tends to legitimize even bad ideas. After all, why is it necessary to squelch weak ideas? Control creates suspicion. The truth can't be that weak. Freedom of expression will allow the stronger ideas to win out, if the general audience will treat ideas with mature skepticism. Let's see if this leads to more or less reason in the world.

John Winterle
128 Western Court
Santa Cruz, Calif. 95060
E-mail: john.winterle@syntex.com

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(The Scientist, Vol:9, #19, pg.13 , October 2, 1995)
(Copyright © The...

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